Anti-violence charity warns of the dangers of increased under-age drinking during the festive period

Adam Fouracre, CEO of anti-violence charity Stand Against Violence (SAV) is urging parents to stay vigilant over the holiday season as parties and celebrations cause a rise in under-age alcohol abuse.

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Adam Fouracre, founder of Stand Against Violence

Peer pressure, a sense of boredom and a belief that it is fun, all contribute to under-age drinking. Notably, during celebrations and in particular New Year, young people are more exposed to alcohol through parties and family gatherings.

Somerset (PRWEB UK) 22 December 2012

Data from the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) reveal that each year there are some 13,000 hospital admissions linked to young people’s drinking. According to the Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) areas in Somerset and Devon such as Taunton, Exeter and Plymouth are significantly worse than the national average for under 18s alcohol related hospital admissions.

The charity which works with schools and youth associations across the country states that in workshops conducted with students age 13-16 years, the response to alcohol and its effects were worrying. Mr Fouracre stated: “The majority of students acknowledged the fact that alcohol can lower their inhibitions and change their behaviour unintentionally which can result in them ending in risky situations. But they still do it. The problem is that they don’t see the long term effect in terms of being a victim or the potential consequences of ending up in prison. It is a case of that will never happen to me.”

Mr Fouracre sadly knows it does happen. His 17 year old brother was murdered in an unprovoked attack by drink fuelled youths while walking home with friends one evening. The charity was set up in Lloyd’s memory and is dedicated to the prevention of youth violence by working with teachers in schools to help students understand the consequences of violent behaviour and how to avoid potential situations. SAV delivers interactive educational programmes through workshops, discussion forums and assemblies that are based around a DVD reconstruction of Lloyd’s attack. By using a real life violent situation and empathy inducing materials, Adam states the message is more effective because students become emotionally engaged.

Mr Fouracre continued: “Peer pressure, a sense of boredom and a belief that it is fun, all contribute to under-age drinking. Notably, during celebrations and in particular New Year, young people are more exposed to alcohol through parties and family gatherings as alcohol is more readily available. Families that are concerned can visit the http://www.sav-ed.co.uk to access the film and the educational resources available for teachers and parents alike.”

In the last 6 months SAV has conducted 15 school workshops and began working with the Somerset Youth Offenders Team. Since their involvement, it has been reported that the participants have not re-offended.


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