PSN Catalyst for new era of collaboration

Public sector no longer considers geographical proximity a basic requirement for shared services, survey reveals An overwhelming majority (nearly 80%) of the public sector is planning to establish or extend shared services according to new research by Kable, on behalf of BT.

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BT Global Services

BT Global Services

(PRWEB UK) 7 November 2012

Public sector no longer considers geographical proximity a basic requirement for shared services, survey reveals

An overwhelming majority (nearly 80%) of the public sector is planning to establish or extend shared services according to new research by Kable, on behalf of BT.

The research findings also reveal widespread acceptance that geographical proximity is no longer a basic requirement for effective collaboration. Over 70 per cent of respondents agreed that common processes (e.g. a similar structure, function or mission) are more important than geographic proximity in the success of shared services and agreed that it is possible to run shared services successfully in different parts of the country.

The research, conducted for the Kable white paper, Shared services in the PSN era: Casting a wider net, indicates that pressure on spending is encouraging public authorities to look beyond traditional shared services patterns and provides a foundation for more ambitious projects. Public sector organisations can look beyond regional initiatives and suppliers and attract customers from around the country. There is potential for best practice centres or hubs to offer genuinely nationwide services.

Some obstacles to progress were also identified by the research. The most common barriers were identified as a reluctance to cede control, a tendency for public sector organisations to exaggerate unique features of their operations, doubt surrounding the potential financial benefits and concerns over the security and reliability of connections to services provided through an outside organisation.

Stephen Roberts, Managing Director, Kable, said: “The evolving PSN promises to offer a more secure and reliable framework — one that provides a major boost for collaborative working and sharing of services between organisations in different parts of the country.

“We believe strongly that a focus on collaboration with similar organisations with like-minded requirements is likely to lead to simpler and more effective implementation of shared services, thus realising greater efficiencies. But, in order to achieve those benefits, there must be a concerted effort to build a culture within public sector organisations that embraces change, is willing to look hard at its business processes and be honest about the degree of local customisation that is really required.”

Neil Rogers, President, Global Government, BT Global Services, said: “This paper not only provides us with a glimpse into a PSN-enabled world, but also shows us the steps that public sector organisations need to take in order to get there.

“PSN opens up so many possibilities to share resources across public sector organisations. If PSN is used smartly and proactively, organisations will see a significant increase in the efficiency of their service delivery. It’s a massive opportunity for the public sector, with advantages that go far beyond ICT cost-saving.

“At BT we have the leading-edge technology as well as the deep-rooted knowledge of the public sector that is needed to help make this happen. We can assist in redrawing lines of collaboration, reinventing organisational processes and redefining standards of service delivery. Simply put, we want to help reshape public services for good by connecting people and organisations for a better future.

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